Amphibians & Reptiles

Amphibians & Reptiles

open weekdays 8am - 5pm
visitors welcome by appointment
information for visitors

phone: (505) 277-1360
fax: (505) 277-1351
museum administrator


mailing:
Division of Amphibians and Reptiles
Museum of Southwestern Biology
1 University of New Mexico
MSC03-2020
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Current Research

Predicting Effects of Climate Change on Riparian Obligate Species in the Southwestern United States

In collaboration with Northern Arizona University, funded by Bureau of Reclamation

Riparian vegetation provides crucial habitat for wildlife and is a high conservation priority for land managers throughout the Southwest. A central scientific challenge is to generate quantitative predictions of how changes in water availability will affect the amount and quality of riparian wildlife habitat. The focus of this project is to study areas that have long-term datasets available (i.e., hydrological, geomorphological, biological), and to characterize a broad range of riparian conditions found in the Southwest. Building on recently developed models funded by the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC), this work links various hydrologic, geomorphic and habitat models to better understand and predict how climate changes will affect critical riparian ecosystems and wildlife in the region.

Information Development for Species of Greatest Conservation Need 

In collaboration with Natural Heritage New Mexico, funded by New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF)

The purpose of this project is to provide updated species information from the statewide species occurrence databases developed under previous agreements, and to create comprehensive databases of species locations and associated information for wildlife with emerging conservation issues in New Mexico. In particular, the division is focusing on transcribing and gathering information from its historical collections that include written accounts of collections and observations of amphibians and reptiles in the state by former students and faculty.