Museum of Southwestern Biology

Undergraduate Opportunities Program
2007-2012

Museum of Southwestern Biology

The Museum of Southwestern Biology is a research and teaching facility in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico.

open weekdays 8am - 5pm
visitors welcome by appointment
information for visitors

phone: (505) 277-1360
fax: (505) 277-1351
museum administrator


CERIA

mailing:
Museum of Southwestern Biology
1 University of New Mexico
MSC03-2020
Albuquerque, NM 87131

shipping:
University of New Mexico
302 Yale Blvd NE
CERIA 83, Room 204
Albuquerque, NM, USA 87131

Outreach

UnO Roadshow

The UnO Roadshow provides benefits to both the UnO participants by improving their skills in communicating science, and the high-school students by exposing them early to the potential for careers in biology. A group of UnO students present their student research projects to high school students to demonstrate how exciting science and higher education can be. We emphasizing the broad range of possible undergraduate research activities at the University of New Mexico. A common theme was how the undergraduate experiences in research for each of these students opened up new perspectives and broadened their future horizon.

Belen High School

Angie Swanson and April M Chavez headed down south to Belen on their last day of school to talk to Belen High School students about research opportunities in Biology at UNM. They conversed with two classes of juniors who asked many questions ranging from "How does a frog come back to life if its heart freezes?" "Why did you choose to study a shrew?" and "What is the safety on the UNM campus like?". Both classes, one consisting of 20 students and the other only about half were inquisitive and good listeners. Mrs. Gallegos welcomes us back in the fall. Angie and April say they love UnO Roadshows and will do them whenever they get the chance.

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Highland High School

On Friday December 16, 2011, the UnO Roadshow traveled to Highland High School in Albuquerque to engage students of various levels, from freshman to advanced placement seniors, in the wonderful world of professional science at the University of New Mexico.  UnO Scholars, Angie Swanson, April Chavez, and Jesse Trujillo, along with PREP Scholar Candice Espinoza highlighted opportunities made available through attending college and choosing science as a career.  Research PowerPoint presentations and specimens were used as tools to discuss professional opportunities in science to 6 classes that are taught by Dana Allen.

Santa Fe Indian School

On Friday October 14, 2011 the UnO Roadshow traveled to Santa Fe to participate in the First Annual Santa Fe Indian School College Fair. UnO students, April Chavez and Kelly Speer, along Director Joe Cook presented a series of motivational talks to 7th and 8th grade Native American students. The talks focused on UnO research projects and emphasized all the future opportunities available to students that go on to college in the sciences. Our highly interactive presentations were enthusiastically received by these future scholars and we enjoyed sharing stew and Indian bread with the students over the lunch hour.

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Walatowa High

Alyssa Begay, Joey Chour and Jesse Trujillo presented their student research projects to high school students in 3 classes (>50 students) taught by Mr. Ron Krueger at Jemez Pueblo to demonstrate how exciting science and higher education can be.

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Rio Grande High

MJ Vargas, Jessie Trujillo, David Banks-Richardson and Hiyatsi Bassett made a visit to Rio Grande High School to talk to Environmental Science and Chemistry students about their research.

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Sandia Preparatory School

Jessica Martin, Jessie Trujillo and David Banks-Richardson gave presentations and worked on activities with high school students at Sandia Prep in hopes of encouraging and nurturing the scientist in all of us.

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Albuquerque High School

Jes Martin, Jesse David Trujillo, and David Banks-Richardson spoke to groups of 100 to 150 ABQ High students for each of the seven periods of the day or a total of one thousand students.