Amphibians & Reptiles

Amphibians & Reptiles

With more than 95,000 specimens, the Division of Amphibians & Reptiles has steadily grown to become one of the largest herpetological collections in the western US. Personnel and associates conduct research in the American Southwest and throughout Latin America. The division is the primary repository of specimens for the New Mexico Dept. of Game and Fish.

Arthropods

Arthropods

Division of Arthropods maintains collections of specimens gathered worldwide. These serve as the basis for discovery of new species and systematic studies of amazing diversity. More than 350 families and 2,300 species are represented in this rapidly growing arthropod collection.

Birds

Birds

The Division of Birds contains more than 40,000 specimens, which represent all bird orders and 85 percent of bird families. The collection contains historic specimens of threatened, endangered, and extinct species such as the passenger pigeon. The largest holdings are from the American Southwest, Peru, and South America.

Fishes

Fishes

The Division of Fishes has 95,000 cataloged lots of fishes - more than 4 million individual specimens. Collections of eggs, larvae, and adults aid in the study of the specialized ecology of desert fishes. The division is the primary repository for academic and agency biologists in New Mexico.

Genomic Resources

Genomic Resources

The Division of Genomic Resources (DGR) maintains more than 460,000 archived tissue samples and nucleic acids from over 200,000 specimens of mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The DGR collection is global in scope, representing taxa from over 30 countries. Our mission is to maintain a permanent reference archive of frozen tissues and DNA to aid in understanding the complexity of biological diversity and to address critical biological problems such as emerging pathogens, habitat degradation, pollution, climate change, and invasive species.

Herbarium

Herbarium

The herbarium houses 130,000 plant specimens dating back to the 1800s. The collection primarily contains vascular plants, but it also contains lichen, mosses, and fungi. The herbarium also has a library, reprint collection, and a laboratory for cytogenetics.

Mammals

Mammals

With more than 265,000 specimens, this division is among the world's five largest mammal collections. Specimens represent more than 1,650 species from localities all over the world, with especially large holdings from Panama, Boliva, Siberia, Mongolia, Alaska, Canada, and the American Southwest.

Parasites

Parasites

The Division of Parasitology holds the third largest collection of parasites in North America. There are nearly 30,000 cataloged parasites, including a growing schistosome archive. This collection is unique in that most parasites are tied directly to the host specimen, allowing powerful integrated views of coevolution.

Natural Heritage New Mexico

Natural Heritage New Mexico

Natural Heritage New Mexico (NHNM) does research on the conservation and sustainable management of New Mexico's biodiversity. We have New Mexico's only state-wide rare species and ecosystems database (NM Biotics) which helps shape conservation efforts. NHNM does biology research and education in the context of conservation and climate change.

Museum of Southwestern Biology

The Museum of Southwestern Biology is a research and teaching facility in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico.

open weekdays 8am - 5pm
visitors welcome by appointment
information for visitors

phone: (505) 277-1360
fax: (505) 277-1351
museum administrator


CERIA

mailing:
Museum of Southwestern Biology
1 University of New Mexico
MSC03-2020
Albuquerque, NM 87131

shipping:
University of New Mexico
302 Yale Blvd NE
CERIA 83, Room 204
Albuquerque, NM, USA 87131

Students working with US Geological Survey


16 November 2016

This Fall semester the Division of Arthropods is fortunate to have 3 undergraduates working with us, with funding from the US Geological Survey, to help clear out a backlog of samples from Bandelier National Monument and the Valles Caldera National Preserve. The samples are for ecological monitoring of ground-dwelling arthropods to study the effects of climate change (Bandelier), or the effects of the 2011 Las Conchas fire (Valles Caldera). The students are separating specimens into basic arthropod groups so the taxonomists can make species identifications and prepare specimens for the museum collection.

The students are working with Mark Ward, the entomologist overseeing the Valles Caldera monitoring; Rachael Alfaro, the GA for our division; and Sandy Brantley, the collection manager for alcohol specimens. Wes said that working with us is like having another class, because we’re there to answer questions about arthropod diversity and evolution.

Lozen Benson
Lozen Benson is a junior, changing her academic direction from biology to philosophy, languages and art. She’s considering applying to the Honors College because of her wide range of interests. She’s from Silver City, NM and enjoys the state’s many natural environments.
Joaquin Garcia
Joaquin Garcia is a senior, graduating in December 2016 in biology, with a particular interest in conservation. He attended the SACNAS (Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science) meeting in Long Beach, CA, earlier this year. Joaquin is applying to graduate schools in Washington, preferably for research in vertebrate conservation.
Wesley Noe
Wesley Noe is a senior, graduating in biology with a chemistry minor in May 2017.  He is taking Chris Witt’s high altitude biology class this semester and will take Howard Snell’s conservation or wilderness biology class next semester. Wes’s interests are in ecology and sustainability of habitats.

past news stories