Amphibians & Reptiles

Amphibians & Reptiles

With more than 95,000 specimens, the Division of Amphibians & Reptiles has steadily grown to become one of the largest herpetological collections in the western US. Personnel and associates conduct research in the American Southwest and throughout Latin America. The division is the primary repository of specimens for the New Mexico Dept. of Game and Fish.

Arthropods

Arthropods

Division of Arthropods maintains collections of specimens gathered worldwide. These serve as the basis for discovery of new species and systematic studies of amazing diversity. More than 350 families and 2,300 species are represented in this rapidly growing arthropod collection.

Birds

Birds

The Division of Birds contains more than 40,000 specimens, which represent all bird orders and 85 percent of bird families. The collection contains historic specimens of threatened, endangered, and extinct species such as the passenger pigeon. The largest holdings are from the American Southwest, Peru, and South America.

Fishes

Fishes

The Division of Fishes has 95,000 cataloged lots of fishes - more than 4 million individual specimens. Collections of eggs, larvae, and adults aid in the study of the specialized ecology of desert fishes. The division is the primary repository for academic and agency biologists in New Mexico.

Genomic Resources

Genomic Resources

The Division of Genomic Resources (DGR) maintains more than 460,000 archived tissue samples and nucleic acids from over 200,000 specimens of mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The DGR collection is global in scope, representing taxa from over 30 countries. Our mission is to maintain a permanent reference archive of frozen tissues and DNA to aid in understanding the complexity of biological diversity and to address critical biological problems such as emerging pathogens, habitat degradation, pollution, climate change, and invasive species.

Herbarium

Herbarium

The herbarium houses 130,000 plant specimens dating back to the 1800s. The collection primarily contains vascular plants, but it also contains lichen, mosses, and fungi. The herbarium also has a library, reprint collection, and a laboratory for cytogenetics.

Mammals

Mammals

With more than 300,000 specimens, this division is among the world's three largest mammal collections. Specimens represent more than 1,700 species from localities all over the world, with especially large holdings from Panama, Bolivia, Siberia, Mongolia, Alaska, Canada, and the American Southwest.

Parasites

Parasites

The Division of Parasitology holds the third largest collection of parasites in North America. There are nearly 30,000 cataloged parasites, including a growing schistosome archive. This collection is unique in that most parasites are tied directly to the host specimen, allowing powerful integrated views of coevolution.

Natural Heritage New Mexico

Natural Heritage New Mexico

Natural Heritage New Mexico (NHNM) does research on the conservation and sustainable management of New Mexico's biodiversity. We have New Mexico's only state-wide rare species and ecosystems database (NM Biotics) which helps shape conservation efforts. NHNM does biology research and education in the context of conservation and climate change.

Museum of Southwestern Biology

The Museum of Southwestern Biology is a research and teaching facility in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico.

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CERIA

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Museum of Southwestern Biology
1 University of New Mexico
MSC03-2020
Albuquerque, NM 87131

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University of New Mexico
302 Yale Blvd NE
CERIA 83, Room 204
Albuquerque, NM, USA 87131

A New Era at the Herbarium

 March 15, 2022

Harpo Faust (middle) gets oriented on her first day on the job, with help from Gwen Houston-Hatton (left), a curatorial assistant in her fifth year, and Dr. Hannah Marx (right), Curator
Harpo Faust (middle) gets oriented on her first day on the job, with help from Gwen Houston-Hatton (left), a curatorial assistant in her fifth year, and Dr. Hannah Marx (right), Curator. 
Photo:  Chris Witt

  

The MSB Herbarium is under new management. Dr. Hannah Marx took over as curator in January 2021 and is excited to grow and evolve the collection, particularly within the context of her research on montane and alpine botany. Dr. Marx has recently hired a new Collection Manager, Harpo Faust, to manage the day to day operations. Harpo has a background in the flora of the west, floristics, collections and rare plants and is excited to work in the Museum and in New Mexico.  

The previous curator, Dr. Tim Lowrey, retired fully at the end of 2020, and the Collection Manager, Phil Tonne, retired in August 2021. We are grateful for their varied contributions to the Herbarium, many of which helped to further our understanding of the flora of New Mexico and the surrounding region. 

MSB is thrilled to have Ms. Faust join our community of eight professional Collection Managers at MSB. These dedicated professional scientists harbor a tremendous base of knowledge on plants and animals that is a resource for UNM students, researchers, and the public.

For a general background on our museum, please watch our introduction video here 

Meanwhile

Staff, curators, students, volunteers, and research associates are working from home as much as possible on digital data curation, data analyses, scientific manuscripts, and grant proposals. New Mexico based field-work is proceeding, while following all appropriate safety guidelines to prevent transmission of SARS CoV-2. 
Many exciting publications by our personnel or based on our collections are coming out. Check out the latest ones here:

 

Latest MSB Division of Mammals Publications

Latest MSB Division of Birds Publications  

Latest MSB Division of Amphibians & Reptiles Publications  

Latest MSB Division of Fishes Publications
 

 

 

Past News